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Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching found in the catalog.

Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching

Daryl R. Tweeton

Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching

by Daryl R. Tweeton

  • 188 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Mines : for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in [Washington] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Uranium.,
  • Leaching.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 19.

    Statementby Daryl R. Tweeton and Kevin Connor.
    SeriesInformation circular - Bureau of Mines ; 8769, Information circular (United States. Bureau of Mines) -- 8769.
    ContributionsConnor, Kevin., United States. Bureau of Mines.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[3], 19 p. :
    Number of Pages19
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15221050M

    2 IN-SITU LEACH URANIUM RECOVERY AND ALTERNATIVES Chapter 2 provides information on uranium recovery using the in-situ leach (ISL) process. The first part of the chapter gives basic information on the type of uranium deposits that are amenable to ISL technology and an overview description of the parts of an ISL facility. Uranium processing - Uranium processing - Leaching: Roasted uranium ores are leached of their uranium values by both acidic and alkaline aqueous solutions. For the successful operation of all leaching systems, uranium must either be initially present in the more stable hexavalent state or be oxidized to that state in the leaching process. Acid leaching is commonly performed by agitating an .

    Uranium from processing has generally a U nominal content superior to natural uranium (%) so that the use of reprocessed uranium is a gain not only in mass but also as separative work units (SWU), which represent the energy required to increase the concentration of U above that of natural uranium. For reprocessed uranium to be used in the fuel assemblies that power a commercial. Description. In situ leach or leaching (ISL) or in situ recovery (ISR) mining has become one of the standard uranium production methods. Its application to amenable uranium deposits (in certain sedimentary formations) has been growing in view of its competitive production costs .

    Well Construction Requirements - General. Well Construction Requirements - Injection Wells Available Information on In Situ Leach Mines b. In situ leach mining of uranium or other metals (This category includes only in situ. While both these techniques produce uranium in different ways, the most common and direct way of mining uranium is known as in-situ leach (ISL) mining. ISL was first tried on an experimental basis in Wyoming during the early 's. Stemming from this, the first commercial in-situ leaching mine began operating in


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Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching by Daryl R. Tweeton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching [Daryl R. Tweeton] Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching book *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching. [Washington]: Dept.

of the Interior, Bureau of Mines: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off., (OCoLC) Online version: Tweeton, Daryl R. Well construction information for in situ uranium leaching. Abstract This Bureau of Mines publication describes present practices of making injection wells for in situ uranium leaching.

Casings, screens, drilling fluids, coring, logging, cementing, and developing are discussed with the objective of aiding those who are starting an in situ leaching operation. Shareable Link. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues.

Learn by: 2. WELL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION FOR IN SITU LEACH URANIUM EXTRACTION. John R. Ward. Search for more papers by this author Bruce E. Pivetz, Nathan Voorhies, Richard T. Wilkin, Potential aquifer vulnerability in regions down-gradient from uranium in situ recovery (ISR) sites, Journal of Environmental Information; Close Figure Viewer.

Return Cited by: 2. well design and construction for in situ leach uranium extraction Article in Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 3(1) - 85 February with 28 Reads How we measure 'reads'. metal that compares well with the recovery in conventional methods. About % of world's uranium production is presently met by ISL industries, which is expected to go up to 20% by the year At present, there are about 98 ISL well fields for uranium in operation all over the world and about 8 sites are under construction or expansion.

low cost operation. In addition, in situ leaching of uranium is more sensitive to good engineering management and attention to detail than other types of uranium mining.

Prior to the operation of an in-situ leach mining facility it is necessary to collect data on: (1) geology, (2) hydrology, and (3) in-situ leaching mining impacts. INTRODUCTION TO IN SITU LEACH URANIUM MINING IN THE USA Since the start of commercial in-situ leach (ISL) uranium mine production in the USA inISL uranium mining has grown from an obscure, experimental technology to the dominant U.S.

producer. U.S. uranium production reached its ma>. What is in situ uranium leach mining. In situ leach mining involves injecting solutions into an ore body through wells to leach the uranium out of the rock, then collecting the fluid through recovery wells and processing it on the surface to remove the uranium.

The solutions used to leach the uranium vary depending on the nature of the ore deposit. WELL CONSTRUCTION METHODS Proper well construction and completion methods are one of the most impor- tant aspects of in situ uranium leaching in terms of bringing a well field into production.

If a completed well does not function as it was intended and another well must be drilled, essentially the cost would be doubled. Abstract This report describes the current methods of design, construction, and development of wells for in situ leaching of uranium.

The discussion includes the alternatives for well design drilling equipment and fluids, grout formulation and emplacement, well integrity. In-situ leaching, also called in-situ recovery or solution mining, is a mining process used to recover minerals such as copper and uranium through boreholes drilled into a deposit, in situ.

In situ leach works by artificially dissolving minerals occurring naturally in a solid state. For recovery of material occurring naturally in solution, see: Brine mining.

The process initially involves the drilling of holes into. Abstract. Sandstone-type uranium deposits are commonly located below the water table in weakly lithified or non-consolidated sands, and therefore they can be exploited using In-Situ Leach (ISL) technology.

Such technology is based on dissolving uranium minerals directly in their host rocks (in-situ) by reactive solutions that are injected through drill holes, and then pumping the dissolved. General description The ISR technique. In situ is a Latin word that translates literally to “on site” or “in position.” Unlike conventional mining methods, where the uranium mineral and host rock are excavated together and the uranium is recovered on the surface, in situ recovery (ISR) technique removes the uranium while leaving the host rock in place.

In situ leaching (ISL), solution mining, or in situ recovery (ISR) involves dissolving uranium in the ground and pumping the solution to the surface where the minerals can be recovered. Information from the World Nuclear Association, the global private-sector organization that provides information on nuclear power, nuclear energy, and the role of nuclear in sustainable development.

First used in Wyoming in the s, in-situ leaching (ISL) mining accounts for most uranium production in the United States. In situ leaching – what it is. ISL involves injecting chemicals, called “lixivants” into an aquifer that contains a uranium ore body (i.e.

deposit). The chemicals used are typically sulfuric acid or ammonium carbonate. Process for the in-situ leaching of uranium from a subterranean ore deposit employing a lixiviant containing an oxidizing agent, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. Prior to the injection of the lixiviant, an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing agent is injected into the deposit in an amount of at least 1 pore volume.

The initially injected acid solution is substantially free of. General geology --Process description --Time schedule for a pilot-scale operation --Well construction methods --Recent and current uranium in situ leach mining operations --Current Bureau of Mines in situ uranium leach mining research and other government agency studies --State and federal permitting agencies for uranium in situ leach mining.

Occurrence of Uranium. Uranium is not a particularly rare element in the earth’s rust. Kirk and Othmer state that uranium is more abundant than cadmium, bismuth, mercury, and silver. About one-third of the world’s uranium reserves are in sedimentary deposits. To date, most of the uranium mining has been in arkosic sediments.

develop and operate uranium in situ leach facilities. Under the provisions of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 40 (10 CFR Part 40), Domestic Licensing of Source Material, an NRC Materials License is required to conduct uranium recovery by in situ leach extraction techniques.Technical Revisions to an In Situ Leach Mine Permit.

Designation of ExemptedAquifers. Injection Wells Subject to This Chapter Well Location and Protection. Well Construction Requirements - General. Well Construction Requirements - Injection Wells.Ion exchange using strong base resins is a well established technology for the recovery and purification of uranium from sulfuric acid leach liquors.

Production of uranium at the Beverley Mine in South Australia includes acidic in situ leaching, ion exchange and uranium precipitation. The salinity present in the groundwater results in a relatively high concentration.